Josh Peters

Biological Engineering

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

I’m a PhD student in Biological Engineering at MIT. Around two billion people in the world are infected with a microscopic bug called Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. Despite this, only a fraction develop tuberculosis. And a fraction of those infected – almost 5,000 a day – die. I put on Stranger Things-esque protection equipment and probe these bacteria to ask, what allows them bacteria to win this tug-of-war? To understand this variation, I look at how both human and bacteria cells change on a genetic level in response to each other, as a member of the Blainey Lab, located in the Broad Institute, and Bryson Lab, located in the Ragon Institute and MIT.

Vaccines aren't yet using our immune system's full potential

The most important invention in medicine could save even more lives

Earth's weirdest creatures are genetic treasure chests

From the axolotl's regenerating limbs to naked mole rat cancer resistance, new sequencing is uncovering new possibilities

Comment 1 peer comment

How scientists are mapping the building blocks of life

A microscopic moonshot hopes to revolutionize biology

Why there probably won't be a 'magic bullet' for cancer

Researchers increasingly view the disease as a sprawling, evolving metropolis of cells

Comment 2 peer comments
has left Comment 7 peer comments

A new study shows that some are 'immune' to CRISPR. What does it mean for biology's breakthrough editor?

It's complicated, and the road from lab to clinic is long

Comment 3 peer comments

Should peer review stop being anonymous?

Prominent researchers can take the gamble, but junior scientists risk retribution

Comment 4 peer comments

To better target cancer, scientists find clues on the surface of cells

New research finds that we might need to take a step back from the inside of cells

Comment 1 peer comment

Plants are not conscious, whether you can 'sedate' them or not

A New York Times story is a case study in what can go wrong in translating science

Comment 2 peer comments

How paper towels could revolutionize DNA analysis

A new method could make it more affordable to diagnose diseases

Comment 2 peer comments

Evolution is a lot messier than we thought

Cells evolved haphazardly, not in one overall arc

Comment 2 peer comments

Why teamwork is better than attempting lone heroism in science

A story of failure, collaboration, and incredibly tiny medicine

Comment 2 peer comments

Dive deeper into the real science behind the headlines with Massive Science Reports

Every month we’ll work with a team of experts to produce reports that can help you make informed, science-driven decisions for yourself & your family.

Join monthly Q&As with the scientists behind each report, help us pick future report topics, and discuss Massive articles in our subscriber forums.

Subscribe for free Learn more