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Max Levy

Chemical Engineering

University of Colorado Boulder

I am a PhD student in chemical engineering, designing nanoparticles to kill multi-drug resistant bacteria. In 2008, I took a course on nanotechnology and became immediately fascinated by the visible, tangible outcomes made possible by invisible technologies. This fascination led me to University of Florida for undergrad, where designed nanomaterials to improve solar cells. After three years of industry experience working on a large scale, my attraction to the minuscule drew me back to academia, where I research all things small. When I’m not zapping bacteria or writing about science, I am playing basketball and hiking in beautiful Boulder, Colorado.

Max has authored 2 articles

Mosquito-borne diseases get a boost from climate change

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Bugs like it hot, and evolve faster when there's lots of carbon dioxide

Max Levy

Futuristic organ-on-a-chip technology now seems more realistic than ever

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Researchers have pioneered what may be the most accurate simulation of kidney function to-date

Max Levy

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Max has shared 4 notes

Meet the all-star cast of marine bacteria that can ruin your warm-weather activities

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Each member of the Vibrio family is unique, but they're all likely getting more common as the oceans warm

Netflix's new show, Diagnosis, replaces House M.D. with the crowd — and exposes failures in the U.S. healthcare system

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The patient in the first episode travels to Italy to get a diagnosis that never even occurred to her local doctors

How a pair of rude gut germs perfectly summarize our war against superbugs

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One overstays its welcome, and the other shows up unannounced to ruin the party

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You're eating, drinking, and breathing microplastics. Now what?

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What are the health implications of eating 250 pieces of microplastic per day?

Anna Robuck

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Why scientists are transplanting artificially grown “brains” into living brains

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Scientists are making major strides in growing fully functional "mini brains" -- but what are the ethics of such science?

Yewande Pearse

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