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Hanusia Higgins

Forest Ecology and Invasive Species

University of Vermont

I’m a graduate student at the University of Vermont’s Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources studying forest ecology and invasive species. Those fields represent the major areas of study in my career, but I’m also broadly interested in ecology and applied science for conservation. Before starting my MS program, I served as an AmeriCorps member with the Hemlock Restoration Initiative in North Carolina, which catalyzed my interest in communicating science, and science-backed management practices, to the general public.

Hanusia has authored 1 article

Backyard data in six US states shows that native mason bees are declining

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For 13 years, volunteers across the mid-Atlantic region helped scientists track mason bees

Hanusia Higgins

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Are invasive insects better equipped for climate change than native species?

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Separately, climate change and invasive species are two huge threats to biodiversity worldwide. What happens when they combine?

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Your own yard could help reverse global insect declines

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Non-native plants are one of many factors driving global declines in insect populations – but you can help

Elyse DeFranco

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You should be excited that scientists are releasing 750 million genetically modified mosquitoes this year

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Texas and the Florida Keys will see the release of GM insects in a plan to reduce disease transmission

Lila Westreich

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