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Surviving the Anthropocene

For centuries, human civilization has impacted the world without any understanding of the consequences. If anything is going to survive what's coming next, it'll have to adapt. How did we get here? What could happen? What needs to change?

Lead poisoning hits low-income children harder than their affluent neighbors

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Children living in poverty suffer greater cognitive and physical effects from lead exposure than children from richer families, even if they live in the same area

Claudia Lopez-Lloreda, University of Pennsylvania

Comment 6 peer comments

Should the age of humans have a geologic name?

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Rebecca Dzombak, University of Michigan

Comment 2 peer comments

There's a straight line from Trump's trade war with China to the destruction of the Amazon

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U.S. exports of soybeans to China have dropped dramatically. Brazil is stepping up to meet Chinese demand — and burning vast areas of the Amazon along the way.

Cassie Freund, Wake Forest University

Comment 1 peer comment

Wildfires in Canada are burning down forests of mushrooms

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Olivia Box, University of Vermont

Comment 3 peer comments

The US-Mexico border is making life complicated for green sea turtles

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Tim Briggs, Northeastern University

Comment 1 peer comment

You're eating, drinking, and breathing microplastics. Now what?

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Anna Robuck, University of Rhode Island

Comment 2 peer comments

There's no corner of the globe safe from microplastic pollution

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Rebecca Dzombak, University of Michigan

Comment 2 peer comments

By 2100, the ocean will be a different color

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Incorporating the colored dissolved organic matter responsible for the color change improves the accuracy of climate models

Maddie Bender, Yale University

Warming oceans cast a chill over New England's sea turtles

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Recent research suggests warming seas will cause more stranded sea turtles

Anna Robuck, University of Rhode Island

Comment 1 peer comment

How shadowy tax havens skirt conservation efforts

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Cassie Freund, Wake Forest University

Comment 1 peer comment

Ancient plankton have climate data hidden in their shells

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Elisa Bonnin, University of Washington

Comment 1 peer comment

These corals love the warming oceans

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Gina Mantica, Tufts University

Comment 1 peer comment

Climate is getting more extreme in every possible way

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Coleman Harris, Vanderbilt University

Comment 2 peer comments

We're studying collapsed civilizations so that ours can endure climate change

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Paleoclimatologists are digging into the connections between the collapse of Maya Civilization and extreme droughts

Brittany Ward, University of Waikato

Comment 3 peer comments

After Hurricane Florence, North Carolina's water quality will go down the toilet

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Anna Robuck, University of Rhode Island

Comment 1 peer comment

It looks like microbes can help clean up mining pollution

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Rose Jones, Bigelow Laboratory of Ocean Science

Comment 1 peer comment

When evolution's path leads to a dead end

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The fossil record shows that nature doesn't always make the right choices

Julie Hollis, Government of Greenland

Coal ash contains lead, arsenic, and mercury – and it's mostly unregulated

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Laura Mast, Georgia Institute of Technology

Comment 1 peer comment

How farmers on the Great Plains are changing the local climate

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Ellen Stuart-Haëntjens, Virginia Commonwealth University

Comment 1 peer comment

Tropical rainforests may be near a tipping point beyond our control

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Michael Graw, Oregon State University

Comment 1 peer comment

A gold rush in the Peruvian Amazon threatens to fill a vital and diverse ecosystem with mercury

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Bats are the canaries in the Amazonian goldmine

Cassie Freund, Wake Forest University

Why don't Americans care about chemicals?

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Anna Robuck, University of Rhode Island

Comment 2 peer comments

Can corals be saved? The key may be in their microbes

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Maite Ghazaleh Bucher, University of Georgia

Comment 3 peer comments

Low doses of contaminants, long ignored, can have vast consequences

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Anna Robuck, University of Rhode Island

Comment 1 peer comment

What does California's future look like? Scientists asked trees

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Blue oaks have up to 500 years of climate history written in their rings

Daniel Ackerman, University of Minnesota

Comment 1 peer comment

Toxic chemicals are being freed from melting glaciers

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Carrie McDonough, Colorado School of Mines

Comment 3 peer comments

Pollution and climate change hurt children most of all

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Renee Salas, Massachusetts General Hospital

Comment 2 peer comments

Alaska's oilfield has been subtly changing the state's environment for decades. Will Congress notice?

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A new study reveals decades of cumulative change at an oilfield where caribou raise their young

Julia York, University of Texas at Austin

Comment 1 peer comment

How Saharan dust can influence health all the way in Florida

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Maite Ghazaleh Bucher, University of Georgia

Comment 1 peer comment

What ancient corn farmers can teach us about engineering crops for climate change

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Gabriela Serrato Marks, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Comment 1 peer comment

Life is evolving through a hurricane of human pollution

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Brittney Borowiec, Wilfrid Laurier University

Comment 1 peer comment

Biodiversity doesn't just arise out of healthy ecosystems. It helps create them

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Why researchers are starting to think differently about biodiversity

Cassie Freund, Wake Forest University

Comment 1 peer comment

We know how to fight wildfires effectively. Why don't we do it?

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Michael Graw, Oregon State University

Comment 2 peer comments

Conservationists can't tackle all of the ocean's problems at once, so scientists are helping them triage

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The ocean contains many vulnerable ecosystems that need protecting. So where should we start?

Abrahim El Gamal, Scripps Institution of Oceanography