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Surviving the Anthropocene

For centuries, human civilization has impacted the world without any understanding of the consequences. If anything is going to survive what's coming next, it'll have to adapt. How did we get here? What could happen? What needs to change?

Wildfires in Canada are burning down forests of mushrooms

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Fungal communities are negatively affected by the frequent, intense forest fires that climate change has brought us

Olivia Box, University of Vermont

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The US-Mexico border is making life complicated for green sea turtles

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Tim Briggs, Northeastern University

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You're eating, drinking, and breathing microplastics. Now what?

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Anna Robuck, University of Rhode Island

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There's no corner of the globe safe from microplastic pollution

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Rebecca Dzombak, University of Michigan

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Climate change is almost too big a problem to study. The solution? Volcanoes.

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Volcanoes blanketed by tropical rainforests are a natural laboratory to study climate change

Cassie Freund, Wake Forest University

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Warming oceans cast a chill over New England's sea turtles

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Anna Robuck, University of Rhode Island

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How shadowy tax havens skirt conservation efforts

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Dark money foreign investments may bankroll deforestation and overfishing

Cassie Freund, Wake Forest University

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Ancient plankton have climate data hidden in their shells

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Elisa Bonnin, University of Washington

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These corals love the warming oceans

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Gina Mantica, Tufts University

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Climate is getting more extreme in every possible way

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Coleman Harris, Vanderbilt University

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Fewer crops are feeding more people worldwide – and that’s not good

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Reduced agrobiodiversity threatens the stability of our whole food system

Karl Zimmerer, Pennsylvania State University

After Hurricane Florence, North Carolina's water quality will go down the toilet

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Anna Robuck, University of Rhode Island

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It looks like microbes can help clean up mining pollution

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Rose Jones, Bigelow Laboratory of Ocean Science

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Trump's wall would harm unique and fragile wildlife on the California border

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Plans must include environmental impact studies

Christa Trexler, UC San Diego

Coal ash contains lead, arsenic, and mercury – and it's mostly unregulated

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Laura Mast, Georgia Institute of Technology

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How farmers on the Great Plains are changing the local climate

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Ellen Stuart-Haëntjens, Virginia Commonwealth University

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Tropical rainforests may be near a tipping point beyond our control

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Michael Graw, Oregon State University

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Why don't Americans care about chemicals?

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We need chemicals for daily life, but seem to feel 'apocalypse fatigue' around their dangers

Anna Robuck, University of Rhode Island

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Can corals be saved? The key may be in their microbes

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Maite Ghazaleh Bucher, University of Georgia

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Low doses of contaminants, long ignored, can have vast consequences

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Anna Robuck, University of Rhode Island

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What does California's future look like? Scientists asked trees

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Daniel Ackerman, University of Minnesota

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What the Ice Age tells us about how plants will manage in a hotter world

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New research seems to resolve a puzzle of why plants struggled in the past

Baird Langenbrunner, UC Irvine

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Pollution and climate change hurt children most of all

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Renee Salas, Massachusetts General Hospital

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How Saharan dust can influence health all the way in Florida

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Maite Ghazaleh Bucher, University of Georgia

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The most cost-effective ways to fight climate change are literally under our feet

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A new study says forests, swamps, and soil are the cheapest ways to help save the planet

Jane Zelikova, University of Wyoming

What ancient corn farmers can teach us about engineering crops for climate change

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Gabriela Serrato Marks, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

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Life is evolving through a hurricane of human pollution

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Brittney Borowiec, McMaster University

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We know how to fight wildfires effectively. Why don't we do it?

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Michael Graw, Oregon State University

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We know terrifyingly little about how our bodies respond to pollutants, but that's changing

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Fish DNA can change in response to pollution. What about the rest of us?

Anna Robuck, University of Rhode Island

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