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Thiago Arzua

Neuroscience

Medical College of Wisconsin

Born and raised in Curitiba, Brazil, Thiago Arzua now pursues his Ph.D. in neuroscience at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Before that, he completed his Bachelor’s degree in Chemistry, with a minor in French, at the University of South Florida. His doctoral research focuses on human stem cells derived neuronal models, such as cerebral organoids. This cutting-edge type of 3D brain tissue can model a variety of brain diseases, as well as brain development, morphology, and physiology.

Thiago has authored 3 articles

A new machine can translate brain activity directly into written sentences

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Translating up to 50 sentences at once, it's about as accurate as human transcription

Thiago Arzua

People missing the scent region of their brain can still smell

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Scientists thought you needed an olfactory bulb to smell — then they discovered two unique women

Thiago Arzua

Miniature brains the size of a pea are sending out brainwaves for the first time

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Are they fetal brains in a jar? No. Should we still be excited and slightly concerned? Yes.

Thiago Arzua

Comment 3 peer comments

Thiago has shared 4 notes

Got a sweet tooth? Your gut bacteria are asking for some sugar

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The gut microbiome and the brain communicate on a desire for glucose (in mice)

Birth and cell death may go hand in hand

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Altering the timing of birth changes patterns of cell death in mouse brains

Could radiation in deep space fry astronauts' brains?

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New research in mice suggests that long-term low-dose radiation impairs learning and memory

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While you sleep, specialized neurons in your brain help you forget

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Forgetting has long been considered a passive process in the brain, but new research puts that idea to bed

Kamila Kourbanova

Comment 5 peer comments

Your brain adjusts your body's clock according to all the colors of the rainbow

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Springing forward for daylight saving time means less blue light, but also light contrasts

Anisha Kalidindi

Comment 3 peer comments