Joshua Peters

Biological Engineering

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

I’m a PhD student in Biological Engineering at MIT. Around two billion people in the world are infected with a microscopic bug called Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. Despite this, only a fraction develop tuberculosis. And a fraction of those infected – almost 5,000 a day – die. I put on Stranger Things-esque protection equipment and probe these bacteria to ask, what allows them bacteria to win this tug-of-war? To understand this variation, I look at how both human and bacteria cells change on a genetic level in response to each other, as a member of the Blainey Lab, located in the Broad Institute, and Bryson Lab, located in the Ragon Institute and MIT.

Joshua has authored 9 articles

A patient was cured of HIV. What should you expect in the future?

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Scientists are buoyed and see a path to future medicines

Joshua Peters

Comment 1 peer comment

Haven't heard of RNA therapy yet? You will

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After a decade of painstaking progress​, the underdog is on the brink of treating a broad range of diseases

Joshua Peters

How dogs are helping us understand human allergies

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If your dog has allergies, chances are you do too. Thanks, microbes

Joshua Peters

Billionaires are rushing into biotech. Inequality is following them into science

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'Free-market philanthropy' raises yet more questions about the future of American public research

Joshua Peters

Comment 2 peer comments

Vaccines aren't yet using our immune system's full potential

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The most important invention in medicine could save even more lives

Joshua Peters

Earth's weirdest creatures are genetic treasure chests

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From the axolotl's regenerating limbs to naked mole rat cancer resistance, new sequencing is uncovering new possibilities

Joshua Peters

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Why there probably won't be a 'magic bullet' for cancer

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Researchers increasingly view the disease as a sprawling, evolving metropolis of cells

Joshua Peters

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Joshua has left Comment 9 peer comments

Futuristic organ-on-a-chip technology now seems more realistic than ever

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Researchers have pioneered what may be the most accurate simulation of kidney function to-date

Max Levy

Comment 1 peer comment

Should peer review stop being anonymous?

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Prominent researchers can take the gamble, but junior scientists risk retribution

Dan Samorodnitsky

Comment 4 peer comments

To better target cancer, scientists find clues on the surface of cells

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New research finds that we might need to take a step back from the inside of cells

Prabarna Ganguly

Comment 1 peer comment

Plants are not conscious, whether you can 'sedate' them or not

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A New York Times story is a case study in what can go wrong in translating science

Devang Mehta

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How paper towels could revolutionize DNA analysis

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A new method could make it more affordable to diagnose diseases

Jennifer Tsang

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Evolution is a lot messier than we thought

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Cells evolved haphazardly, not in one overall arc

Melanie Silvis

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Why teamwork is better than attempting lone heroism in science

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A story of failure, collaboration, and incredibly tiny medicine

Samantha

Comment 2 peer comments

New HIV drugs show a disease under control – for those who can afford them

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Even as new therapies raise hopes, diagnoses and costs prevent widespread treatment

Danny Jomaa

Comment 1 peer comment