Climactic Change

Climate change is no longer an open question—for researchers today, it's a baseline assumption. How these changes will impact ecosystems, public health, and our future are now the questions we need to ask.

Climate change is almost too big a problem to study. The solution? Volcanoes.

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Volcanoes blanketed by tropical rainforests are a natural laboratory to study climate change

Cassie Freund, Wake Forest University

Climate change once heated the oceans and caused "The Great Dying"

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This time the planet is warming much, much faster

Elena Suglia, UC Davis

Comment 2 peer comments

These corals love the warming oceans

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Gina Mantica, Tufts University

Comment 1 peer comment

Tracking the history – and future – of the world's largest penguin breeding colony

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Climate change is upending migration patterns that predate Cleopatra

Brittney Borowiec, McMaster University

Comment 1 peer comment

How farmers on the Great Plains are changing the local climate

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Ellen, Virginia Commonwealth University

Comment 1 peer comment

Why don't Americans care about chemicals?

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Anna Robuck, University of Rhode Island

Comment 2 peer comments

What Pokémon GO can teach conservationists about public engagement

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In six days, players collected as much data as naturalists had in 400 years

Cassie Freund, Wake Forest University

How fieldwork on a remote, tiny island taught me to navigate family dinners

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Doing science far away helped this ecologist talk to those close to home

JENNIFER HOWARD, Wake Forest University

Pollution and climate change hurt children most of all

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Renee Salas, Massachusetts General Hospital

Comment 2 peer comments

Boobies of the Galápagos are replacing their disappearing food source with junk fish

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Decades of research show how the sardine's decline threatens an entire ecosystem

JENNIFER HOWARD, Wake Forest University

Comment 1 peer comment

Seagrass meadows protect fish, coral and humans from disease – and we’re losing them

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This seemingly mundane plant might be more important than we realize.

Megan Chen, Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History